We are a charity devoted to stopping teenagers and young people from taking their own lives

Local art gallery creates suicide awareness sculpture for OLLIE

From 1st-15th December, local art gallery Nude Tin Can is showcasing the first exhibition of Louise Gendrot aka LouZyArt. LouZy’s work is described as model making infused with hidden installations. Inspired by London grit, modern society and conceptual ideas, they are a culmination of large sculptures and hidden scenes, creating a vibrant and interesting exhibition for the inquisitive.

LouZyArt has been commissioned to create an original piece of art named ‘Below’ representing the sadness, despair, tragedy, loss and helplessness of suicide. In a recent interview, Hatty, owner of Nude Tin Can and sculpture creator Louise explain the motivations behind the collaboration.

How did the Nude Tin Can become aware of OLLIE.
NUDE (Hatty): A conversation with our neighbour next door to the gallery – led us to Stuart Folconer. We heard his own story and about the charity he created for awareness and being a mother myself of a teenage son it felt something close to my heart.

What prompted you to create a piece of art in partnership with OLLIE?
ARTIST (LOUISE): My artwork always stems from a conceptual idea. Photographer Jeremy had visited the gallery when I was there, and we got into conversation about my upcoming exhibition at Nude Tin Can this December. The idea was thrown my way to create a piece or installation in association with The Ollie Foundation – from there I developed the idea of the piece called ‘Below’.

Talk us through the ideas behind the concept and what story you want the sculpture to tell those that see it?
The idea was of people looking into a clear box or being on the outside of the box unable to get in – it depends how you interpret that visually. There is a clear inner box and a clear outer box. The inner box is filled with spheres containing parts/thoughts/objects. Stuck in a tank of binding gloop. Some spheres sink, some slowly rise to the surface. There is a period of time the viewer can watch the spheres slowly move and ponder their thoughts and also take some time to relate to a teenager who may be stuck so much inside they can’t reach the outside nor let anyone else in to help.

How can people come and see it for themselves?
‘Below’ is part of the exhibition which is on now till 15 December at Nude Tin Can, 125 Hatfield Road St Albans. It’s absolutely free.

 

 

More information can be found at http://www.nudetincan.com/  and  www.louzyart.co.uk/